How To Measure Handlebar Diameter? [3 Easy Method]

In this article, we will discuss how to measure the bike handlebar diameter.

The diameter of the handlebar is one of the most important factors when it comes to a bike’s performance. It affects the handling of a bike and also its aerodynamics.

A simple way to measure handlebar diameter is by measuring the distance between two handlebar ends. The distance between these two ends is called the “handlebar radius”. This measurement can be done with a simple ruler or with a dial gauge.

What Is Standard Handlebar Diameter?

Handlebar diameter is a standard measurement of the width of a handlebar in inches or millimeters. It is used to compare different handlebars and you can easily determine the width of a handlebar by comparing it to other handlebars.

The standard handlebar diameter can be measured using a ruler or caliper and comes in different sizes depending on how many degrees you want your handles to be at each end of your bars:

  • Mountain Bikes: 25.4mm (1 inch) older style, and 31.8mm (1.25 inch) oversized.
  • Road Bike: 26mm (1.02 inch) older style, and 31.8mm (1.25 inch) oversized.
  • BMX: Standard handlebar diameter is 22.2mm (0.87 inches)
  • Cruiser Bikes: Standard handlebar diameter is 25.4 (1 inch) or 31.8mm (1.25 inch).

How To Measure Handlebar Diameter?

A handlebar diameter is a measurement of the width of the bar. It is used to measure how wide a given bar is, and it’s used to compare two bars.

The handlebar diameter of a bike can be measured using 3 different methods:

  • Method 1: Use a set of digital or vernier scale calipers
  • Method 2: Use a simple measure tape
  • Method 3: Use a piece of paper and a ruler

Method 1: Use a set of digital or vernier scale calipers

  1. Place the bicycle as straight as possible to prevent the handlebar from moving when starting to measure the handlebar diameter.
  2. Use a vernier scale or digital caliper to measure the handlebars as accurately as possible.
  3. Place the caliper on the handlebar and adjust the measurements until you are exactly on the circumference of the handlebar with no gaps.
  4. Finally, check the handlebar reading and note this value.

This method is the most accurate and precise method of measuring handlebar diameter.

Method 2: Use a simple measure tape

  1. Place the bicycle as straight as possible to prevent the handlebar from moving when starting to measure the handlebar diameter.
  2. Use a simple tape measure to take the measurements corresponding to the diameter of your handlebar.
  3. Now simply wrap the tape measure around the handlebar to get the circumference of the bar in millimeters and then divide by pi (𝜋) which equals 31.4 mm.

Method 3: Use a piece of paper and a ruler

  • Place the bicycle as straight as possible to prevent the handlebar from moving when starting to measure the handlebar diameter.
  • Use a piece of paper and wrap it around the handlebar to form a circumference.
  • Then use a pen and mark the piece of paper where the circumference ends.
  • Finally, lay the paper flat and measure with a ruler the marked length from the edge of the paper to the mark you just made with the pen and divide by 31.4mm.

FAQs

Q. How to measure handlebar width MTB?

To measure the width of the MTB handlebar, simply place your handlebar on a flat spot and use a tape measure to measure from one end of the handlebar to the other end of the handlebar to get the maximum length of the bar which is the same as the width of the handlebar.

Q. How to measure handlebar width road bike?

To measure the correct width of the handlebars of a road bike, it is necessary to measure the useful width of the handlebars, since at the ends it changes to a curved shape.

Therefore, the width of the handlebar of a road bike is measured from the center where the curvature of one end begins, to the other opposite end of the handlebar using a tape measure.

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Author
Allen
Hi, I'm the initiator and writer of this blog. Bikes were and will be my first love, and my favorite hobby, that's why I decided to start this blog and write about my discoveries and techniques to improve my bikes or repair them.

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